IME image-01

Court Reporters – Four Tips on What to Expect at an I.M.E.

Attorneys need Individual Medical Examinations to be reported and certified from time to time.  An Independent Medical Examination is conducted by a doctor, chiropractor or physical therapist who has not previously been involved in a person’s care and examines the individual.  There is no doctor, chiropractor, physical therapist relationship.

The following are some tips that I would give a court reporter reporting their first I.M.E.:

  1. Arrive at least 30 minutes early. Upon occasion the examiner will not know a court reporter is scheduled to be present. Arriving early allows for time to ensure everyone is on the same page and in agreement that the examination will be stenographically recorded.
  2. Anticipate having no table or place to put your computer. I oftentimes will use my steno or computer bag as a little table.
  3. A best practice is to print timestamps on the final transcript to allow counsel to know how long each segment of the examination lasted.
  4. Don’t worry about the value of the transcript as far as the doctor or patient describing for the record what is being demonstrated. The transcript may read, “Turn left. Turn right.  Lift your foot.” Just write what is said and don’t think you need to interject because the examiner is not making a good record.

Reporting an I.M.E. is not complicated, but it is helpful to know what the court reporter can expect.

 

Kramm Court Reporting – Facebook

@rosaliekramm – Twitter